China Diaries: Christmas is Banned!

23rd December – 29th December 2019

I went into Christmas week with high hopes, they were soon dashed! Last week I asked my point of contact with the English department if it would be ok to do a Christmas lesson on Wednesday as it was Christmas day. She gave me the green light and said I could even do the whole week! So I planned my little Christmas lesson, complete with “Santa Shark” (oh yes, there is a Christmas version of “Baby Shark ladies and gentlemen) and went in on Monday fully dressed for Christmas in my “Santa Paws” T-shirt and candy cane earrings. Things were going well, most of the children knew Santa Claus but the other Christmassy characters were unfamiliar to them so we had a bit of fun as I tried to explain each one.

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Trying to take a cute family portrait…
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Presents ready for Christmas day.

Then there was class five, and to be honest I don’t if it was because I am sick or if it was because we had no Chinese teacher to help us communicate or what was happening but things quickly went awry. The first hurdle seemed to be the word toy as they didn’t understand exactly what the word “toy” translated to in Chinese and they aren’t allowed toys in school so it was hard to give them an example. I tried to explain using a skipping rope but skipping is a competitive sport in schools in China so I don’t think I really got the message across. One student got a little too excited about his skipping rope and as he pulled it out of his desk managed to smash his glass water bottle, which I think actually contained corn juice, on the floor. Queue ten minutes of cleaning up corn juice mixed with glass and one of the Chinese teachers throwing my Q&A prop cards in the bin… even though they were nowhere near the scene of the accident!

Q&A cards retrieved and thoroughly dowsed in hand sanitizer I had about ten minutes of class left to get through about twenty minutes of content and all I wanted to do was go home and have a nap! We rushed through the questions and sang “Santa Shark” before anything else could go wrong.

And here comes the dashing, no I haven’t got one of Santa’s reindeer’s names confused, I mean the dashing of my Christmas hopes! Christmas was banned! Cancelled! Forbidden! Basically the Chinese government has told schools that they must focus on Chinese culture and as a result our school decided that there would be no celebrating Christmas of any kind, including the foreign teacher giving a lesson on the subject. So Monday evening I received a message asking me to plan a new lesson on the topic of food instead.

On Christmas Eve I stopped in at my friend’s restaurant to give her daughter a little Christmas stocking/boot thing that I had put together. I filled it with chocolate a sweets and a tiny little mouse hair tie, I also found a Santa pillow with a tartan Santa hat for sale in Miniso and just had to buy it for her (and one for me too…). I woke up on Christmas morning to a photo of her holding the little mouse hair tie as she slept and it warmed my heart! That’s what Christmas is all about really, it doesn’t have to be a big expensive gift, the little heartwarming moments are what make it special.

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Christmas goodies!

 

It was a beautiful sunny day on Wednesday and it was about 20 degrees Celsius, I wore my Christmas jumper anyway. China might not have been celebrating Christmas but that wasn’t doing to stop me being a walking, talking pot of Christmas spirit! It wasn’t all doom and gloom on Christmas Day though. I tutor three kindergarten students and the main aim of each lesson is to read a book together so I took the book “What’s a Christmas?” into our lesson and played some Christmassy games. I also took three little boots of sweets to class with the deal that if they were well behaved for the whole lesson they would each get one.

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One of my first grade students.
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“What’s a Christmas?”
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Three little boots for three little humans.

The evening was when it really felt like Christmas. One of the other foreign teachers here invited us round for a few drinks, nibbles and Christmas songs. It was lovely to have a group of people together to celebrate Christmas, for a little while I honestly thought I would be celebrating alone!

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Christmas Crew
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Merry Christmas!

This turned out to be one of the busiest weeks I’ve had since arriving back in China and I think that helped to keep my mind off of being away from home for the holidays. On Thursday evening the primary school held an “English Competition and Show” for grades one to three. I was asked to come and judge the grade three “Story Telling Competition” and as a result was sat right in the front row. Usually when I go to watch any of the school performances I am way up the back so it was nice to have such a good view for a change. The show lasted about an hour and a half and had everything from songs to spelling bees to short plays. There was even a Christmas song despite the schools no Christmas rule (apparently the head teacher stormed out when he saw it…) It was the perfect way to spend boxing day and it made me strangely emotional, especially when the students sang a song about their dads. It is amazing the amount of effort that goes into these performances and the students all looked so cute in their costumes. In all, just a magical evening.

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Each grade has a theme; grade one is Garden Grade, grade two is Ocean Grade and grade three is Forrest Grade.
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The show begins.
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Little Christmas angels!
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Farmyard sing song.
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So many beautiful costumes!
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Prize giving.

 

This week I turned 26, still feels strange to say it out loud. The school is closed for five days starting Tuesday so I ended up having to work on my birthday which wasn’t so bad to be honest. My English department teachers invited me out for dinner to celebrate. When I arrived at the office the exact invitation I got was “We will go for pigeon, to celebrate your birthday”… I had to tell them I was a vegetarian but I happily went to the restaurant and ate all the side dishes of vegetables. It was such a lovely thing for them to do as most of them only had an hour break before they had to go back to work. The school day for primary school here is 6:50 am to 8:30 pm with a two hour lunch break (12 pm – 2:30 pm the students have a scheduled nap in that time) and an hour dinner break (5:30 pm – 6:30 pm) and the teachers take it in turns to shepherd the students from class to the dinner hall to nap time and back to class again.

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Grade One English Department
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I didn’t want to open this, it was to perfect looking!

I share my birthday with my friend’s daughter, Ning Ning. I actually think this fact is one of the things what led us to become good friends, when they found out last year they got so excited and insisted that I celebrate my birthday with them and I quite happily accepted. This year was much more chilled out because Ning Ning’s mum is pregnant and due at the end of January but there was still plenty of love and, most importantly, cake to go around!

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Ning Ning loves to draw so when I saw this I knew it was the perfect gift for her birthday! She loved it!

If you’ve been reading these weekly update since I started back in November then you will know that I lost my lucky bracelet on my way to China. I’m not usually a superstitious person but even I had to admit that my first few weeks in China didn’t exactly go smoothly! My friend Rose (Ning Ning’s mum) helped me realise that all my bad luck started when I lost that bracelet. As the weeks have gone by my luck seems to have evened out and to be honest I stopped thinking about my bracelet, but Rose had not. For my birthday she gave me two bracelets; the first is a traditional Chinese style bracelet made by bending and drying a plant stem to fit the wrist, attached is a little money bag to bring me good luck and, to quote Rose, “a lot of money.” Here’s hoping! The second is made from Chinese red beans, red is the luckiest colour in China. In Chinese culture it represents joy and happiness as well as luck, it can also mean celebration, vitality and even fertility in the traditional colour system and it is commonly believed that red helps to ward off evil spirits. Basically I am super lucky now.

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I am the luckiest person I know.

What a final week of 2019! It’s been a pretty wild ride to here but I wouldn’t have changed it for the world because every experience has made me whole. This week has made my heart so full and it’s about to overflow because in one week I fly home for a month and a half of catch ups, adventures and freezing temperatures.

Happy New Year and remember… Christmas will never be banned if I’m around!

 

For more of my China adventures click on one of these:

 

 

Staying Put: 10 reasons I can’t leave China quite yet.

I am about a month away from completing my internship here in Sanxiang and the original plan was to move on from here to Vietnam at the beginning of August… but I just can’t quite do that, turns out China isn’t finished with me yet. I have been offered a job  at the middle school here. It might not be teaching my adorable little first graders, but it meant a chance to stay in China for another six months, an opportunity I just couldn’t turn down!

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Blue skies on campus.

There are so many amazing things about living and working in China, but I managed to somehow slim them down into my top ten reasons why I’m staying in China:

 

1.Life is Simple: I’m not going to lie, I found life in the U.K. stressful, the pressure once you come out of university to go straight into a job and start your career is a lot to handle! This is especially true when, like me, you aren’t even one hundred percent sure a career in your chosen field of study is what you really want. I was stuck working in the same part time job I had taken to get me through university. I was working to make money and as much as I enjoyed parts of waitressing, it was obviously not where I wanted to be. I tried to find a grad job (admittedly I didn’t try very hard) but found the process anxiety inducing. Some may say the same about uprooting your life and moving it half way around the world but for me it just made sense. Life in China is a simple as working at a job I love, it might not pay much but that has never been a motivation for me in terms of finding work. The hardest part of my job is planning a lesson that will keep forty six-year-olds entertained for forty minutes, then I get to go home and relax for the rest of the day! The most stressed out I have felt since arriving in China was the weekend where my USB stick went walk about and I thought I had lost all my lessons, then Monday morning it turned up in class, simple as that. This is possibly the least stressed out I have been in my adult life, that alone is reason enough for me to stay.

 

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You try being stressed out when there are two hot springs in your town.

 

2. The people are friendly: It is impossible to walk anywhere without someone saying “hello” to you or waving at you from across the street. You smile at someone walking past and they smile right back at you. Westerners in China are somewhat of a rarity which means that quite often you will be stared at but not once has it made me feel uncomfortable or weird. They aren’t staring to be rude, but because they have most likely never seen a westerner before, that and the fact that pale skin is considered beautiful here and I have never been able to catch a tan in my 24 years living on this Earth! Almost anywhere you go in China you will be asked for your photograph, if you want to feel like a celebrity then this is the place for you! Maybe this is just because I live in a relatively small town, but I don’t think I have been anywhere in China where the people aren’t genuinely friendly. It is such a contrast to back home where, my tiny little village aside, smiles are most often met with a blank face at best and a suspicious look at worst. It’s just the British way, but I much prefer to walk through life smiling outwardly and receiving smiles in return.

 

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I challenge you to go anywhere in China and not get asked for a photograph. (this photo actually has an interesting story but I’ll save that for later)

3. Everyone wants to help you: Not only are Chinese people incredibly friendly but they also have the most generous spirits. They are so helpful it is almost unbelievable, and they don’t want anything for it. No matter if you are friends or complete strangers they will help you and expect nothing in return, except maybe a WeChat add. I actually had a shop assistant insist on helping me pick a deodorant only last week. I know it is their job, but where in the U.K. could you go and have someone actively try and help you pick out a deodorant without it being considered ‘a little bit weird”? Obviously, I needed no help in this task and yet I received it anyway, I already knew what deodorant I wanted before I went in there to buy it, but how do you explain that when your Mandarin level is below beginner? I also walked out with a VIP card so no complaints here!

 

4. The food: Unpopular opinion but I am not a fan of traditional British food. I find it bland, boring and mostly fully of meat, the only British tradition I am partial to is maybe “Chip Shop Chips” and even then, I would never say I crave them. In China finding vegetarian food is so easy and it’s not just a boring old salad like everywhere in the U.K. seems to want to feed us vegetarians. My first choice in just about every restaurant is, of course, egg fried rice but I have also found a love for Hot Pot (just don’t pick the spicy option), Chinese BBQ (grilled garlic aubergine and spicy tofu is incredible) and my new favourite meal Egg and Tomato. This is served everywhere from the canteen to higher end restaurants and I have even learnt to cook it for myself, I love it that much! The food in China is just some of the best food I have ever eaten. I eat so much healthier here and I actually want to cook for myself. For once in my life I’m not living off of pasta, grated cheese and tomato ketchup (although I’m not going to lie, there is always a bottle of ketchup in the fridge for emergencies).

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Egg fried rice IN A PINEAPPLE!
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So simple but so good.

5. Cost of living: Honestly, I am not lying when I say I earn next to no money, I am an intern after all, but my small monthly allowance is more than enough to live on and that is taking into account my ridiculous shopping addiction! I can do a weekly shop for around ten pounds if I am smart about it. If you know where to look for it, fruit and veg are so cheap it feels like stealing. I take away plain rice from the canteen for no cost every day to use when I cook my evening meal and even eating out never costs more than a tenner at a time (I’ve even seen us have a meal for two for under a fiver)! Everything is cheaper here, even alcohol; a cocktail can cost as little as three pound and there are no entry fees for clubs or bars. I get my nails done every few weeks, something I would never be able to afford back in the U.K. but here it only costs about six pounds! The cost of living in China made the decision to stay here all that easier.

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So pretty and so cheap!
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Cocktails in Friends Bar are only £3!

6. Public Transport: This is something else that is amazingly cheap here in China, but not at the sacrifice of quality or cleanliness. I have used the subway, busses and DiDi (China’s answer to Uber) to get around in China and all three have been pleasant experiences. My most used form of transportation is probably the bus, it is cheaper than DiDi and there is no subway in Sanxiang as it is not a big enough town for such a luxury. The bus costs about 50 – 80p to travel between towns, some of which are about an hour away from us here in Sanxiang (imagine getting the bus from Aberdeen to Dundee for 80p). The busses are always on time, clean and they are, possibly most importantly, air conditioned! Take note First Bus and Stagecoach, China knows how to run a bus service.

 

7. Speaking Mandarin: I think learning another language is probably a plus side no matter where you choose to live abroad but honestly nothing makes me happier than when I say a full sentence (well an almost full sentence) to one of my students in Mandarin and I watch it blow their little minds! “Teacher you spoke Chinese!” and then they start talking to me one hundred miles an hour in Mandarin and I have to try and tell them that actually “Teacher only knows that one sentence in Chinese and now I have no idea what you are saying to me.” In all seriousness though I have never been the best when it comes to learning languages, despite really wanting to be able to, so when I pick up on random words or phrases that Chinese people around me are saying I feel like I have really achieved something. I am still nowhere near even being able to have a conversation in Mandarin and don’t even ask me to read the characters, but the longer I stay here the more I will pick up and it is definitely one of the best things about living and working in China.

 

8. There is so much to explore: I have been in China three and a half months and I have visited three of its provinces, I have barely scratched the surface of what this incredible country has to offer. Of the three provinces I have travelled to each one has me with a completely new and different experience. Firstly, there was my week in Beijing for orientation, this was a big city experience like I have never had before. from the bright lights to the crowded markets, the incredible great wall of china to the peaceful gardens of the Forbidden City; Beijing was a month of experiences packed into one week. Then there is the unreal natural beauty of Zhangjiajie Natural Forest Park in the province of Hunan. Sandstone Quartz pillars as far as the eye can see and more rain forest than anyone person could hope to explore in one life time all make Zhangjiajie feel like another planet and don’t forget the imminent threat of a monkey ambush to keep you on your toes. Finally, we have my current home province of Guangdong, I am discovering more and more about this area of China every day. I am still finding stumbling upon new places in my own town of Sanxiang let alone the bigger cities of Zhuhai, Zhongshan and Guangzhou. How can I leave now when China still has so much more to offer?!

 

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If you don’t know where this bar is you’ll never find it!

9. I feel inspired here: I have always been a creative person, I didn’t choose to study a creative subject to pay the bills, but I had fallen out of love with my creative side back home. Maybe this is what happens when you work so hard at one thing for a long period of time (try six years of studying art and design in the same city you grew up in), but I think I just desperately needed a change of scenery. China definitely has no shortage of inspiration, whether that be for photography, blog post or any other creative projects I manage to sink my teeth into while I’m here! Living in China has definitely allowed me to revisit my creative side from a different angle and I find myself actively searching for places to go in my spare time that allow me to practice my photography, write an interesting blog post or even create exciting content for a video.

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Sunset is my favourite time of day

10. No two days are the same: When I tell people I teach the same lesson plan twenty times a week to roughly eight hundred students I guess I can understand why they might think my life can become a bit repetitive at times but every day is a completely different experience. What works in one class might be a complete disaster in another, what keeps one class entertained for forty minutes might only hold another classes attention for ten minutes and it is through these challenges that I find myself constantly motivated. At home I think I had fallen into a rut, working four or five days a week and spending at least the other two or three (if not more) in one bar or another, occasionally a club if we were feeling particularly adventurous. I’m not saying I hated my life at home or that I wasn’t having fun but I knew the world had more to offer me than this and I also knew that I had more to offer the world. “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” Maybe one page is enough for some people but for me, I need to fill the book and then start a new one.

 

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My first graders make me laugh everyday.

So there we have it, I’m staying in China! Not forever, there are too many countries out there for me to pick just one and stick to it, but for now if you need me this is where I’ll be…

“Can I eat that”: A Coeliac in China

Most people who know me will know how difficult I am to feed. I was diagnosed with Coeliac Disease at the age of eight; this means I cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and (indirectly through cross contamination in mills) oats. When I told people I was moving to China for five months one of the most common responses I received was “China?! But you can’t eat noodles or soy sauce. What are you going to eat?!” I’m not going to lie this was a concern for me as well, I never eat Chinese food at home because the risk of contamination is usually too high. Add to that the obvious language barrier and well, I knew it wasn’t going to be easy.

Having said all of that, I have never let my Coeliac Disease stop me from travelling before and I wasn’t about to let it stop me this time either. After a conversation with the ImmerQi team here in China, via skype, I was reassured that food would not be an issue. On arrival in Beijing we were each handed a name card along with our room key, on the back of mine was a hand-written note explaining in both English and Chinese that I am allergic to gluten (still not entirely sure everyone in China knows what gluten is but it seems to have served me well so far). I used this every day in the canteen in Beijing and they knew exactly what I meant.

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Allergic to Gluten

I was placed in a Southern Province of China, I assume this because in the South it is more common for people to eat rice than noodles. As part of my placement meals are provided by the school cafeteria, I found after the first week that this was a bit of a hit or a miss for me in terms of what I could actually eat so I decided to apply for a meal allowance from the school instead. This was initially turned down. I applied a second and the this was accepted, thanks to the efforts of my awesome ImmerQi contact Ben and my wonderful school contact Rani. I will now receive a food allowance along with my living allowance that is already provided as part of my internship on the fifteenth of every month.

Eating at restaurants has been an interesting experience, I find myself spending more time asking “can I eat that?” than actually eating anything. It’s a long process but eventually you get a meal out of it, even if everyone else is finished by the time yours arrives.  It helps to have someone with you who speaks Mandarin if you don’t speak it yourself, this way you don’t spend the whole meal trying to communicate through google translate (not to put down google translate because I have to say it can be an absolute life saver in some situations).

 

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Create your own Hot Pot

 

I think the key to being a Coeliac in China is to have patience; be prepared to explain yourself, sometimes multiple times, it’s just one of those things. Coeliac disease and gluten intolerances aren’t really a well-known thing in China like they are becoming in the Western World. Also, it helps if you like rice…

 

 

Some tips for a travelling Coeliac (whether you are travelling to China or France, Tanzania or Morocco):

 

  1. Before you leave the country visit this website http://www.celiactravel.com/cards/they have an explanation of Coeliac disease translated in just about every language. Print a few out so you can hand them to your servers in restaurants. I have been using them since I went to Portugal in 2010!
  2. If you don’t have the card with you have “I am allergic to gluten” saved as one of your top phrases on google translate and LEARN IT! Before you go, while you’re there, up to you but if you can say it and show it then people are much more likely to take you seriously when you say you can’t eat something.
  3. If it doesn’t look gluten free, it probably isn’t. Don’t risk it! There is absolutely nothing worse than being glutened abroad, especially if, like me, you tend to travel alone. Try explaining to 3 people you just met why you need full use of the bathroom for the next hour…
  4. Be prepared. I always have snacks on me; not just because I like to snack but because if we go out to eat and it turns out there is nothing there for me, at least I have a back-up to keep me going until I can find a proper meal

Too Hot (Pot) to Handle: Exploring Sanxaing and Zhongshan

This time last month was my first day in Sanxaing, I know I keep saying it, but I cannot believe how quickly time is going here. The last month has been an absolute blur of experiences but I am going to try my best to put them into words.

 

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One of the best days and the best view!

 

Our first week started with us finding a true hero, that hero is called Jack and he also works here in San Xin Bilingual school as an English teacher. We found Jack in a crowded cafeteria when I spotted the only other white person in the room and we descended upon his table like moths to a flame. He was then bombarded with the same set of questions twice as those of us at the end of the table struggled to hear the conversation. Luckily for us this was somehow not an off-putting experience for Jack and he has become our guide, translator, handy man, rice pudding chef and an invaluably useful friend to have around. He has helped us so much, we probably should have paid him some kind of fee to be honest! First stop on Jack’s guided tour of Sanxaing was a trip down the main road next to the school. Although affectionately known as “Death Alley” (due to the sheer volume of traffic, including busses, that somehow squeezes itself through the narrow street along-side pedestrians) by the foreign teachers we were quickly reassured that no one has actually died there… to the best of their knowledge. Here you can find everything you need; grocery stores, hairdressers, E-bike shops, coffee shops, the lot!

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Market street

Next on to the main market street which runs on weekends, and then down to the shopping mall. This has everything from a two-story supermarket to a cinema, a KFC to more traditional restaurants and even a small arcade. Dinner was an experience that I’m sure no one will be forgetting in a hurry. Spicy Hero is a hot pot restaurant near the mall and really the clue is in the name, order spicy you will get spicy!! We ordered a mild spice soup for the vegetarians and plain soup for the meat eaters, but mild spice at Spicy Hero is anything but mild. I have never been reduced to actual tears by a meal before but here I was bright red, sweating and shivering at the same time and despite my best efforts eyes watering like someone was cutting onions under my nose. We took about two full cups of chillies and chilli oil out of that soup added litres of new water to it but in the end, we had to admit defeat and switch to plain soup. Mild spice in China is not the same as mild spice in Britain… lesson learnt!

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No Spicy Not a Hero (We are not heros).

That weekend we made the forty-five minute bus journey into Zhongshan, the neighbouring town, to visit some of the other interns and to see the Lantern Festival that marks the end of the Spring Festival celebrations. The festival took place in Sun Wen Memorial Park in Zhongshan which had been filled with lanterns of all shapes and sizes. Unfortunately, we missed the fireworks, but it was still incredible to see the park lit up completely by lanterns and LED lights. There are many theories as to the origin of the lantern festival, but its roots can be traced back almost 2000 years and it is most commonly believed to be linked to the reign of Emperor Ming of Han and the rise of Buddhism in China. In the past it was most likely that the lanterns would have been of simple design and would have probably been red to symbolise good luck going into the new year. Now the lanterns are shaped into everything from animals to buildings as well as the more traditional simple designs.

 

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Fairy Light Covered Trees.

 

 

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Lantern Structure.

 

 

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Fairy Light Tunnel.

 

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Of course I found the Panda Lanterns.

 

A trip to one of Sanxaing’s hot spring resorts provided us with the most relaxing day. There was a pool for every flavour you can think of; vinegar, coffee, rose petal, lemon, wine, mint, the list goes on! For around £16 you have access to the hot spring, swimming pool, buffet and nap area for the whole day (provided you don’t leave the resort). They will even help you organise a car back into town, just be prepared to wait a little while for it to arrive…

 

 

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Chrysanthemum Pool.

 

Jack also introduced us to his friend Enrico who owns an Italian restaurant in the centre of Sanxaing. Between them they have shown us some of the best places to eat around town, but we always go back to Enrico’s, and why wouldn’t we with Nutella Pizza and Tiramisu on offer for desert!

 

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Jess, Jack, Jessi, Molly, Luke, Me, MC and Justin at Enrico’s.

 

 

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More of the crew at Enrico’s.

 

One of my favourite days so far has to be when we climbed the hill at the back of our school for sunset. From the top you can see the whole of Sanxaing and it was one of the most spectacular views I have ever seen. The hike up only took us about an hour and for the most part there was a very clear path through the trees, only towards the end did it get a bit overgrown, but we made it through with a bit of effort. Coming down we got a little bit lost as I suggested we avoid the overgrown path in favour of a path that looked a bit more manageable in the dwindling light. Despite this diversion we did eventually make it home and joined up with the rest of the group to go bowling at the bottom of “Death Alley”.

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Jumping photos are hard to perfect… I think we need a bit more practice.

 

There is still so much more to see and do here in Sanxaing and I cannot wait to experience all of it. There are probably things that I have done here already that I have missed out from this post just because this month has passed by me in such a blur. I am slowly starting to figure my way around the area and to be honest as quickly as it has gone, it also feels like I have been here my whole life at the same time. I don’t usually find it hard to settle into a place, but I didn’t really think I would feel as at home here as I do. This is my home now, for now at least.

 

P.S. Benjamin is Awsome…

Love and Ketchup

“I love you more than Ketchup” – if I say this to you feel special. Seriously. My love for ketchup knows no bounds, it is the first thing I ask for in a restaurant, it is the first thing I put on my Asda delivery, it is the last thing I think about before I go to sleep…ok maybe that’s a bit far but you get the idea. I have an addiction.

Today I put Ketchup on my curry. I was judged, severely. I enjoy ketchup with my curry it gives it a bit of extra flavour and also cools down those accidental extra hot disasters. Even the one person who loves ketchup as much as I do questioned my decision when the bottle left the fridge. I guess it just comes down to personal taste, obviously I am alone in the world when it comes to ketchup and curry.

“If I could marry them I would, but I think that would be a bit illegal.” – Evie on Olives…I can’t stand olives. See? Personal taste, it just so happens that my personal taste is a bit on the stranger side of normal.

I’m looking for the one who understands and accepts this. Then and only then will I say “I love you more than Ketchup.”